Have you ever walked into a space or house and thought the colour scheme was horrendous? Generally, the first thing people tend to change when they move into their new home or office etc. is the colour scheme. We all tend to have our favourite colours, but maybe there’s more to this.

While not an exact science, according to ColorPsychology.org each colour creates a reaction in our brain and therefore can influence our brains’ decision-making process. Although colours are subjective certain colours have universal significance. But is it possible that your favourite colour may cause restlessness? Or that specific colours may make you more creative? If so, what colours are best for what?

Darker, ‘heavier’ colours like greys, blues and browns

As these colours tend to increase productivity and promote seriousness they would be great to use in office spaces and in corporate environments. However, they should be avoided in kitchens and dining areas, since they are thought to have a negative impact on appetite.

Blue could make your house more sellable according to an American survey on 30,000 homes sold in 2017. This colour is associated with calm, trust and the ability to make decisions.

Using dark colours all over smaller spaces can make the space feel more enclosed or confined. A great alternative is to use these on feature walls, which can create opulence.

Lighter, warmer colours like yellow and orange

Lighter colours are said to increase creativity and inspiration, so if your work requires a lot of imagination these could be the perfect choice.

Although yellows are deemed to be joyful they can also be over stimulating. This suggests that a bright version of this colour isn’t an ideal choice for a baby or child’s bedroom.

The colour orange can aid digestion, which makes it a great choice for dining areas.

Green

Green is the colour of nature and is associated with calm and safety. This makes it a perfect colour for bedrooms. It is thought to aid sleep and even to slow your metabolism.

Red

Whilst red is often linked to passion and strength, it is also the colour of danger and can be overbearing as it attracts attention more than any other colour. Some studies found it can raise blood pressure and heart rate which would make it a less than ideal colour for the bedroom.

Fuchsia

However, mixing red with a hint of blue creates fuchsia which also resonates with passion, but it is not an overwhelming colour.

White

White evokes feelings of innocence, light, purity, cleanliness and safety. As it is a neutral colour it is suitable for all areas.

And if you just wanted to follow the most popular colour trends? We asked the local experts

Both Derby based experts from Dulux and Crown trade shops agree, that white is the colour they sell the most of. They also both agree that in terms of a pigmented colour, different shades of grey tend to be the most popular.

Why these colours?

One reason for whites being so popular could be that they cost less than pigmented paints, which work well with the trend of creating colour schemes and colour accents with various accessories, as Mike Taylor, the manager of Crown Decorating Centre points out. Vic Branch, the manager of Dulux Trade Centre, notes that having a feature wall is still very much on trend, either surrounding them with lighter shades or just neutral white tones.

Mike adds that aside from whites and greys, Crown’s Antique Cream sells very well, which is a different shade of white, similar to the colour of warm buttered toast.
On the other hand, Vic says that the Dulux shop have seen an increase in the purchase of different shades of blue as well.

Influences

When I asked them about what might influence people’s colour choices Vic suggested that popular television programmes are also known to create trends, so people sometimes find inspiration from their favourite shows. But both experts agreed on colour being a personal choice.

It isn’t proven but…

If each colour evokes a reaction in our brain when we internalise it, it could be the reason for why we like certain colours and dislike others. This might be why different shades of whites remain best sellers. They could be the easiest to agree on. What do you think?

Written by Petra Kalnai